National Park Hiking

The Delicate Arch, a natural arch near Moab, Utah

Image via Wikipedia

Hiking in National Parks is much more than a way to get a little exercise, it’s more than a weekend away, it’s more than a hobby, it’s more than a nice way to spend a few hours, it’s more than great scenery, it’s more than the opportunity to see wildlife in unspoiled, natural habitat,  it’s more than all of these things, in fact, it’s all of these things and MUCH MUCH MORE.

We are blessed with some of the best hiking territory in the world, and lots of it. How lucky are we? National Park Hiking is available for everybody, it don’t matter how far you can walk, it don’t matter how much time you have, it don’t matter how much money you have, it don’t matter if you have young children to tag along, or you feel obliged to invite Granny because she’ll bring some of her fantastic secret recipe trail bars . . . it don’t matter ‘cos there are plenty of National Park hiking trails to suit all ages and abilities. They’re rather nicely spread around the country so wherever you are, you’re never far away from some great National Park hikes. There are National Parks in 27 states in America, they cover a total of 210,000 km2, and each one of them has more than it’s fair share of wonderful hiking trails just waiting for you to get out and explore.

English: Hiking trail to Chimney Rock in White...

This one’s in Minnesota – is that near you?

Rules of National Park Hiking

National Park Hiking means freedom, but it’s also important that you’re a responsible hiker and follow the hiking code, as well as any individual rules of the National Park you choose to take a hike.

Some National Parks allow you to take your dog with you on your hike, but you must keep your dog under control at all times, you certainly don’t want Buster to start chasing the wildlife and upsetting the balance of nature, or inadvertently coming face to face with a Grizzly . . .

Some National Parks allow you to enjoy overnight hiking trips but you are only permitted to camp in designated areas . . . you might have to book a space in advance so check it out before you pull your hiking boots on and get out your National Park Guidebook.

The most important rule in the hikers code;

Leave the National Park exactly as you find it, and take away only memories and photographs!

Whichever National Park you choose to hike and explore, make sure that you know what to expect before you get there, don’t try to do more hiking than you are capable of . . . I know that some of the rescuers are quite hunky but do you really want to spend a cold night on a mountainside suffering from exhaustion waiting for them to find you . . . I didn’t think so!

Know where you’re going, know what to expect, know the rules, make sure that you have all passes necessary and follow the individual National Park rules. Oh, and don’t forget




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